(bajar para versión en castellano)

BETWEEN WALLS

Glória Picazo

City walls, everything recorded on the walls of town streets and squares, have been a very special attraction for so many artists. In the 1920s, Joan Miró would wander around the historic centre of his native city, Barcelona, captivated by those randomly discovered anonymous scribbles. The photographer Brassaï did the same in 1930, but in his case on the streets of Paris under the surrealist perspective prevailing at the time. His photographs are the result of observing and making inventories of the graffiti and flaws of the walls that, out of complete anonymity, showed a great creative force. Some years after, he retraced his steps to check the marks left on them by the passage of time. Decades later, in the 1960s, the French *nouveaux réalistes*, especially Jacques Villeglé and Raymond Hains, walked the streets of Paris, undoubtedly driven by the situationist influence of Guy Debord, and took possession of posters and advertising hoardings to create their own works, applying the technique of *décollage*. This involved pulling down, cutting and even moving the hoarding to the studio to construct new visual-poetic creations based on the memory recorded on city walls.

These examples make up a framework of reference for many of the creative ideas we find in later decades, when the city and the urban landscape shaped by it became an ideal setting for the intervention of contemporary artists. And to do so they continued using methods of “drifting” around the city, similar to those followed by their predecessors—we could almost call them neo-situationist strategies—which allowed them to discover, observe and act upon it. They used intervention methods that followed steps very similar to those employed by the artists cited, directly acting on city walls, as well as integrating new contributions through the introduction, for example, of media such as video in contemporary creation.

This is the case of Juan López, an artist who from his early days, when he was still studying at the Fine Arts Faculty in Cuenca, took the street and its walls covered by layers and layers of adverting posters to extract new shapes with a cutter, such as in *Rancid* (2002), an intervention in the form of a 3 x 6 m relief. Cutting the multiple layers of accumulated posters in order to empty certain parts of them enabled him to achieve unique shapes, such as the magnificent blue shark of *Rancid*, or to construct phrases in bas-relief, recording messages such as “Ten fe” in an intervention called *Have faith* (2002), also in the city of Cuenca.
In these early works, López was already showing an interest in appropriating the city, in reflecting on an urban landscape which also has a high media profile, given that it is invaded by all kinds of advertising messages that have turned most cities today into “metropolises of consumption.” But it was perhaps in these initial moments when his interest in language was also being defined, in the wordplay that its use and manipulation allowed, with a critical, political but also poetic meaning and, of course, with a good dose of humor. Interventions such as *You will be eternal* confirm this. This project was developed by Juan López in collaboration with Víctor García and carried out in Madrid in 2004. They perforated the awning canvas typically used on balconies in the centre of this city and sewed it onto the protective netting of the building’s restoration work. Given its conciseness the phrase takes on a lapidary tone, and in its monumentality it resembles an advertising hoarding, piquing the curiosity of passers-by and making them reflect on its encouraging message.
This is also the case of the intervention *Design will make you hares*, a new bas-relief on a wall in Valencia in 2004. In this case, the phrase played with the Spanish words *liebre* (hare) and *libre* (free), which are phonetically very similar. Also in the same spirit, but now with greater complexity in the execution of the project, we find *Come see me*, created in the framework of the 1st Canary Islands Biennale of Art, Architecture and Landscape (2006). On this occasion, Juan López broke up the phrase, and the first word, *come*, could be seen on the baggage belt in Tenerife Airport; the second word, *see*, on a plane belonging to the company that flies between the Canary Islands and, finally, the last word, *me*, was again on the baggage belt in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria Airport. By scattering the phrase, Juan López achieved a much wider geographical scope for his project and, perhaps not without a certain humor, questioned the difficult visibility that these types of events usually suffer as a result of the geographical distance, dispersal between the islands and, consequently, the limited feasibility of a project with these characteristics, given that this biennale was not repeated. Perhaps on this occasion Juan López, using humor, exercised what he himself called “a poetic resistance” to this kind of event, a resistance that is not unusual in many of his projects.
Thus far, his most monumental intervention was carried out in Valparaíso (Chile) in 2010: *The size of all the things*, a 70-meter-long hoarding with this phrase, which is so commanding and at the same time so open to all kinds of interpretation.
Applying a method of *détournement* in the way advocated by Guy Debord and Gil J. Wolman in their 1956 essay *Mode d’emploi du détournement*, in his textual interventions Juan López attempts to subvert ideological language, which is often opaque, and to turn it into an enunciative language that shows another reality. Using pre-existing elements, phrases we barely see in the urban chaos, by simple manipulation he manages to twist the meaning, giving it a new sense that, as we have already observed, oscillates between the political and the poetic. This is what happens in a recent photograph uploaded by the artist to his Facebook account: a motorway sign showing the message “CA PA AL LEM A,” which read out loud recalls in Spanish the sound of “Capa el lema,” an invitation to castrate and mutilate the slogan, that is the message, when in fact its original meaning was totally different as the words form part of the phrase “Campaña de Alcoholemia” (Alcohol Control Campaign). His method of *détournement* was very simple: without manipulating anything on the sign, hiding some letters and creating the photomontage; and thus, with a very simple distortion, a new highly uncomfortable meaning emerges. As he affirms in an interview with Bea Alonso: “The idea has always been to extract something new based on what is already established, with the dual intention of making us see that we can read things differently to how they are presented to us and to confront everyday situations with a degree of humor.”

However, not all his projects involve this linguistic component but all of them feature a reflection on and questioning of urban chaos, the city as a human construction of great complexity, which offers spaces of relations and life shared between citizens. All these components in turn make up an urban culture on which Juan López has acted since his beginnings, because, like the geographer Jordi Borja, he also sees the public space as a political space “of formation and expression of collective wills, the space of representation but also of conflict.” Based on these premises, some of his projects propose that the city enters the cultural spaces and that the language that emerges from the street coexists with the artistic codes of the art institution. And that, in short, the high and the low join together, as had already happened in the 1980s with Jenny Holzer and Barbara Kruger or, in another sense, with Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring.
These projects include *Today I aspire to nothing*, created for the Espai 13, of the Fundació Joan Miró in 2009, and for which he had the collaboration of Urban Cats Bcn, a group of practitioners of *parcours*, an urban practice that Juan López used so that its members would move around inside the exhibition space, tirelessly jumping over its architectural elements. Moreover, this project is the first by the artist in which video starts to take on a greater role, and which achieved its maximum expression in the installation *A la Derriba*, specially conceived for La Panera Art Centre, in Lleida, in 2012. The architectural space of this center exploded into eight great orifices, which allowed the life of the adjacent streets into it through previously recorded videos. The artistic container opened out to relate directly with the everyday. “The breaks work as metaphors of the idea of the ruin of an inoperative system and of a disoriented society,” the artist himself commented. But we also find a new play on words in the title of this project. In this case, the artist wanted to link the basic principle guiding the project, which was “derribar los muros” (pull down the walls) of the center, with the concept of *deriva* (adrift), which means “with no fixed direction”; this is markedly post-situationist but it can be applied equally to a ship that is adrift and to a society that is adrift, like today’s, because of the collapse of the so-far prevailing economic system. Through the breaks represented on the walls by his drawings made with black vinyl and masking tape, details gradually appear that allow us to visually recompose the activity happening in the adjacent streets: a resident looking over the balcony, a van passing by or a group of children coming in to visit the center. The proximity and division of the detail enables us to recompose the surroundings of the building housing the art center.

We find the close dialog that Juan López establishes with architecture in previous projects such as *Planetary Union*, carried out in the Museu Nacional da República, Brasilia, in 2010. Oscar Niemeyer’s white architecture cracked; cracks appeared in its walls, ramps and columns, and they shed fragments that were scattered around the building in an exercise of rare reality. It is an emblematic building, inaugurated in 2006 as the culmination of a long architectural and urban development process that placed Brasilia at the center of an intense debate, at a moment when architecture is so openly positioned in favor of political power and, thanks to Juan López’s intervention, seems to be cracking physically and metaphorically.
A similar process, but different in its aim, was used in the development of the project *The space invades* for the OK Centrum, in Linz, in 2012. In the title of the installation, Juan López is alluding to the 1978 Taito Corporation video game, whose extraterrestrials have become a familiar icon in the streets of so many cities. Once again, popular culture bursts out in the buildings of the Upper Austrian Culture Quarter, in Linz; the “space invades the architectural nave” and thus the ceilings of its school and convent burst and reveal an intense red that appears behind the vaults, while the pilasters crack. After his intervention, the arched vault not only opens visually but also conceptually, as this cultural center is beginning a period of renovation.

To conclude, we must briefly mention the installation *Rerotary*, which Juan López carried out in the Sala Naos, in Santander, in 2009. It is a surprising project because of its monumentality: 60 meters of drawings that reach a height of up to 5.5 meters. The complexity achieved in this immense wall drawing, with its rotary printing presses, working, spilling ink of all colors and throwing and expanding letters and phrases into the space, was without doubt the turning point that later allowed him to confront new and increasingly more complex tests in which architecture becomes both a challenge and an inestimable ally.

Glória Picazo
March 2013

Bea ESPEJO, “Juan López. Evolución no siempre implica progreso,” *El Cultural*, Madrid, May 8, 2012.
Jordi BORJA, “Renacimiento de las ciudades,” *Exit*, No. 17, Madrid, 2005, pp. 124-137.
Bea ESPEJO, op. cit.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ENTRE MUROS

Glória Picazo

Los muros de la ciudad, todo aquello que se halla inscrito en las paredes de calles y plazas urbanas, han ejercido una atracción muy especial en tantos y tantos creadores. Joan Miró, ya en la década de los veinte, cuando deambulaba por el casco antiguo de su ciudad natal, Barcelona, se dejaba fascinar por aquellos garabatos anónimos descubiertos al azar, como también lo haría el fotógrafo Brassaï en 1930, pero en su caso recorriendo las calles de París bajo la mirada surrealista que imperaba en aquel momento en esa ciudad. Sus fotografías son el resultado de observar y inventariar aquellos grafitis y desconchados de los muros que, desde el absoluto anonimato, mostraban una gran fuerza creativa. Transcurridos unos años, volvía sobre sus pasos para constatar las huellas que el paso del tiempo había dejado en ellos. Décadas más tarde, en los años sesenta, los nouveaux réalistes franceses, especialmente Jacques Villeglé y Raymond Hains, recorrían la ciudad de París, movidos sin duda por la influencia situacionista de Guy Debord, y se apropiaban de carteles y vallas publicitarias para realizar sus propias obras, aplicando la técnica del décollage. Se trataba de arrancar, cortar e incluso trasladar la propia valla al estudio, para construir nuevas propuestas plástico-poéticas a partir de la memoria inscrita en los muros de la ciudad.

Estos ejemplos configuran un marco de referencia para muchas de las propuestas creativas que encontraremos en décadas posteriores, cuando la ciudad y el paisaje urbano que ella configura se convierten en un escenario idóneo sobre el que el artista contemporáneo podrá intervenir. Y para hacerlo, seguirá utilizando procedimientos de «deriva» por la ciudad, parecidos a los seguidos por sus antecesores —casi podríamos llamarlos estrategias neosituacionistas—, que le permitirán descubrirla, observarla y actuar sobre ella. Tanto Emplearán métodos de intervención que seguirán pasos muy parecidos a los utilizados por los referentes citados, actuando directamente sobre los muros de la ciudad, como integrarán nuevas aportaciones, gracias a la introducción, por ejemplo, de medios como el vídeo en la creación contemporánea.

Y este es el caso de Juan López, un artista que ya desde sus inicios, cuando todavía estaba cursando sus estudios en la Facultad de Bellas Artes de Cuenca, tomó la calle y sus paredes tapizadas por capas y capas de carteles publicitarios, para actuar con el cúter sacando nuevas formas, como en Rancid (2002), una intervención en forma de alto relieve de 3 x 6 m. Sus cortes en las múltiples capas de carteles acumulados, para vaciar determinadas partes de las mismas, le permitían sacar formas singulares, como el magnífico escualo azul de Rancid, o bien construir frases en bajo relieve, para inscribir mensajes como «Ten fe» en una intervención también en la ciudad de Cuenca, Have faith (2002).
En estos primeros trabajos, Juan López ya mostraba ese interés suyo por apropiarse de la ciudad, por reflexionar sobre un paisaje urbano que a su vez es sumamente mediático, puesto que está invadido por todo tipo de mensajes publicitarios que han convertido la mayoría de las ciudades actuales en las «urbes del consumo». Pero quizás sea en estos momentos iniciales cuando también se fue definiendo su interés por el lenguaje, por los juegos lingüísticos que su uso y manipulación le permiten, con sentido crítico y político, pero también poético, y, cómo no, con unas buenas dosis de humor. Intervenciones como You will be eternal (Serás eterno) así lo confirman. Dicho proyecto fue realizado por Juan López en colaboración con Víctor García, y se llevó a cabo en Madrid en 2004. Troquelaron la lona de toldos de balcón, típicos del centro de esta ciudad, y la cosieron a la malla de protección de las obras de remodelación del edificio. La frase, por su concisión, adquiere un tono lapidario; por su monumentalidad, muestra un carácter plenamente publicitario, y por todo ello, apela a la curiosidad del transeúnte y lo impulsa a reflexionar sobre el mensaje de ánimo que conlleva.
También es el caso de la intervención Design will make you hares un nuevo bajo relieve realizado en una pared de la ciudad de Valencia en 2004. En este caso, la frase jugaba con las palabras liebre y libre, que en español se parecen tanto fonéticamente. Y también en este sentido, pero ya con una complejidad mayor de realización del proyecto, encontramos Come see me, realizado en el marco de la I Bienal de Arte, Arquitectura y Paisaje de las Islas Canarias (2006). En esta ocasión, fragmentó la frase, y la primera palabra, ven (come en inglés), podía verse en la cinta de recogida de equipajes del Aeropuerto de Tenerife; la segunda palabra, a (to), en un avión de la compañía que cubre los vuelos entre las Islas Canarias, y finalmente, la última palabra, verme (see), se hallaba de nuevo en la cinta transportadora de equipajes, en el Aeropuerto de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria. Con la dispersión de la frase, Juan López conseguía que su proyecto alcanzara un ámbito geográfico muy amplio y, quizás no sin ciertas dosis de humor, cuestionaba la difícil visibilidad que este tipo de manifestaciones suele tener, por la distancia geográfica, por la dispersión entre islas que proponía esta bienal y, como consecuencia de todo ello, la poca viabilidad de un proyecto de estas características, puesto que dicha bienal no tuvo una segunda edición. Quizás en esta ocasión, Juan López, recurriendo al humor, ejerció lo que él mismo vino en denominar «una resistencia poética» ante este tipo de convocatorias, una resistencia que, por otra parte, es algo no inusual en muchos de sus proyectos.
Hasta el momento, su intervención más monumental ha sido la llevada a cabo en Valparaíso (Chile) en 2010: The size of all the things, una gran valla de setenta metros de largo con esta frase tan imperativa y, a su vez, tan abierta a todo tipo de interpretaciones.
Aplicando un procedimiento de détournement a la manera que preconizaron Guy Debord y Gil J. Wolman en su ensayo Mode d’emploi du détournement, publicado en 1956, Juan López trata, en sus intervenciones textuales, de subvertir el lenguaje ideológico, que a menudo suele ser opaco, y convertirlo en un lenguaje enunciativo, que evidencie otra realidad. Utilizando elementos preexistentes, frases que en el caos urbano apenas percibimos, consigue con una simple manipulación que su sentido quede tergiversado, que adquiera un nuevo significado que, como hemos observado anteriormente, oscila entre lo político y lo poético. Esto es lo que sucede en una reciente fotografía colgada por el artista en su cuenta de Facebook: un panel de autopista en el que aparece el mensaje «CA PA AL LEM A». Si en un primer momento nos es difícil captar su sentido, pronto descubrimos que nos está sugiriendo que «capemos, mutilemos el lema, el mensaje». Pero el mensaje original era otro muy distinto: «Campaña de alcoholemia». Su proceso de détournement ha sido muy simple: no manipular nada del panel, ocultar algunas letras y realizar el fotomontaje; y así, con una distorsión muy sencilla, surge un nuevo significado realmente incómodo. «La idea —afirma— siempre ha sido la de sacar algo nuevo a partir de lo que ya está establecido, con la doble intención de hacer ver que se pueden leer las cosas de distinta manera a como nos las presentan y la de afrontar las situaciones cotidianas con cierto humor».

Sin embargo, no todos sus proyectos conllevan este componente lingüístico; en cambio, sí que todos ellos exhiben una reflexión y un cuestionamiento sobre el caos urbano, sobre la ciudad como construcción humana de gran complejidad, en la que se dan espacios de relación y de vida en común entre los ciudadanos. Todos estos componentes configuran a su vez una cultura urbana sobre la cual Juan López ha decidido actuar desde sus inicios, porque, coincidiendo con el geógrafo Jordi Borja, ambos consideran el espacio público también como un espacio político «de formación y expresión de voluntades colectivas, el espacio de la representación pero también del conflicto». A partir de estas premisas, algunos de sus proyectos proponen que la ciudad entre en los espacios culturales, que el lenguaje surgido en la calle conviva con los códigos artísticos propios de la institución arte. Y que, en definitiva, el high i el low se sumen, como ya había sucedido en la década de los ochenta con Jenny Holzer y Barbara Kruger, o en otro sentido, con Jean-Michel Basquiat y Keith Haring.
Entre estos proyectos está Today I aspire to nothing, realizado para el Espai 13, de la Fundació Joan Miró, en 2009 y para el cual contó con la colaboración del grupo de parkour Urban Cats Bcn, una modalidad urbana que Juan López utilizó para que sus miembros se desplazaran por el interior del espacio expositivo, saltando incansablemente sobre sus elementos arquitectónicos. Asimismo, este proyecto es el primero del artista en el que el vídeo empieza a ganar un gran protagonismo, y que alcanzará su máxima expresión en la instalación «A la Derriba», pensada especialmente para el Centre d’Art la Panera, de Lleida, en 2012. El espacio arquitectónico de este centro estallaba en ocho grandes orificios, que dejaban pasar a su interior la vida de las calles colindantes mediante grabaciones de vídeo tomadas previamente. El contenedor artístico se abría para relacionarse directamente con lo cotidiano. «Las roturas funcionan como metáforas de la idea de ruina de un sistema caduco y de una sociedad desorientada», comentaba el propio artista. Pero también en este proyecto encontramos un nuevo juego lingüístico en su título. En este caso, el artista quería unir el principio básico que guiaba el proyecto, que era «derribar los muros» del centro, con el concepto deriva, que significa «sin rumbo fijo», de marcado carácter postsituacionista, pero que igualmente puede ser aplicable tanto a una embarcación que ha perdido el rumbo y que navega a la deriva como a una sociedad a la deriva, como la actual, por el desmoronamiento del sistema económico imperante hasta ahora. A través de las roturas representadas en los muros mediante sus dibujos a base de vinilo y cinta aislante negros, van apareciendo detalles que nos permiten recomponer visualmente la actividad que transcurre en las calles adyacentes: una vecina asomada al balcón, una furgoneta pasando o un grupo de niños entrando a visitar el centro. La proximidad y la partición que nos ofrece el detalle nos permiten recomponer el todo que circunda el edificio en el que se halla el centro de arte.

El estrecho diálogo que Juan López establece con la arquitectura, lo encontramos ya en proyectos anteriores, como Planetary Union, realizado en el Museu Nacional da República, en Brasilia, en 2010. La blanca arquitectura de Oscar Niemeyer se resquebrajaba; en sus muros, rampas y columnas aparecían grietas, y de todos ellos se desprendía fragmentos de pared que se dispersaba por el edificio, en un ejercicio de inusitada realidad. Se trata de un edificio emblemático, inaugurado en 2006 como culminación de un largo proceso arquitectónico y urbanístico que ha situado Brasilia en el punto de mira de un debate intenso, en el momento que la arquitectura se sitúa tan abiertamente a favor del poder político, y que, gracias a la intervención de Juan López, parece resquebrajarse física y metafóricamente.
Un procedimiento parecido, pero distinto en su finalidad, fue utilizado en la realización del proyecto The space invades para el OK Centrum, de Linz, en 2012. En el título dado a la instalación, Juan López alude al nombre del videojuego de Taito Corporation creado en 1978, cuyos extraterrestres se han convertido en un icono habitual en las calles de tantas y tantas ciudades. De nuevo la cultura popular irrumpe en los edificios del Upper Austrian Culture Quarter, de Linz; el «espacio invade la nave arquitectónica» y, así, los techos de su escuela y de su convento estallan y dejan ver un rojo intenso que aparece tras las bóvedas, al tiempo que las pilastras se agrietan. Tras su intervención, la nave abovedada se abre no solo visualmente, sino también conceptualmente, puesto que este centro cultural está iniciando una etapa de renovación.

Para finalizar, hay que citar brevemente la instalación Rerotary, que llevó a cabo en la Sala Naos, de Santander, en 2009. Se trata de un proyecto sorprendente por su monumentalidad: 60 metros lineales de dibujo que alcanzan una altura de hasta 5,50 m. La complejidad conseguida en este inmenso wall drawing, con sus maquinas rotativas funcionando, derramando tinta de distintos colores y lanzando y expandiendo letras y frases por el espacio, fue sin duda alguna el punto de inflexión que le ha permitido con posterioridad enfrentarse a nuevos retos, cada vez más complejos, en los que la arquitectura se convierte en un desafío y, al mismo tiempo, en un aliado inestimable.

Glória Picazo
Marzo de 2013

Bea ESPEJO, «Juan López. Evolución no siempre implica progreso», en El Cultural , Madrid, 8 de mayo de 2012.
Jordi BORJA, «Renacimiento de las ciudades», en Exit, núm. 17, Madrid, 2005, pp. 124–137.
Bea ESPEJO, Op. cit.

(bajar para versión en castellano)

BETWEEN WALLS

Glória Picazo

City walls, everything recorded on the walls of town streets and squares, have been a very special attraction for so many artists. In the 1920s, Joan Miró would wander around the historic centre of his native city, Barcelona, captivated by those randomly discovered anonymous scribbles. The photographer Brassaï did the same in 1930, but in his case on the streets of Paris under the surrealist perspective prevailing at the time. His photographs are the result of observing and making inventories of the graffiti and flaws of the walls that, out of complete anonymity, showed a great creative force. Some years after, he retraced his steps to check the marks left on them by the passage of time. Decades later, in the 1960s, the French *nouveaux réalistes*, especially Jacques Villeglé and Raymond Hains, walked the streets of Paris, undoubtedly driven by the situationist influence of Guy Debord, and took possession of posters and advertising hoardings to create their own works, applying the technique of *décollage*. This involved pulling down, cutting and even moving the hoarding to the studio to construct new visual-poetic creations based on the memory recorded on city walls.

These examples make up a framework of reference for many of the creative ideas we find in later decades, when the city and the urban landscape shaped by it became an ideal setting for the intervention of contemporary artists. And to do so they continued using methods of “drifting” around the city, similar to those followed by their predecessors—we could almost call them neo-situationist strategies—which allowed them to discover, observe and act upon it. They used intervention methods that followed steps very similar to those employed by the artists cited, directly acting on city walls, as well as integrating new contributions through the introduction, for example, of media such as video in contemporary creation.

This is the case of Juan López, an artist who from his early days, when he was still studying at the Fine Arts Faculty in Cuenca, took the street and its walls covered by layers and layers of adverting posters to extract new shapes with a cutter, such as in *Rancid* (2002), an intervention in the form of a 3 x 6 m relief. Cutting the multiple layers of accumulated posters in order to empty certain parts of them enabled him to achieve unique shapes, such as the magnificent blue shark of *Rancid*, or to construct phrases in bas-relief, recording messages such as “Ten fe” in an intervention called *Have faith* (2002), also in the city of Cuenca.
In these early works, López was already showing an interest in appropriating the city, in reflecting on an urban landscape which also has a high media profile, given that it is invaded by all kinds of advertising messages that have turned most cities today into “metropolises of consumption.” But it was perhaps in these initial moments when his interest in language was also being defined, in the wordplay that its use and manipulation allowed, with a critical, political but also poetic meaning and, of course, with a good dose of humor. Interventions such as *You will be eternal* confirm this. This project was developed by Juan López in collaboration with Víctor García and carried out in Madrid in 2004. They perforated the awning canvas typically used on balconies in the centre of this city and sewed it onto the protective netting of the building’s restoration work. Given its conciseness the phrase takes on a lapidary tone, and in its monumentality it resembles an advertising hoarding, piquing the curiosity of passers-by and making them reflect on its encouraging message.
This is also the case of the intervention *Design will make you hares*, a new bas-relief on a wall in Valencia in 2004. In this case, the phrase played with the Spanish words *liebre* (hare) and *libre* (free), which are phonetically very similar. Also in the same spirit, but now with greater complexity in the execution of the project, we find *Come see me*, created in the framework of the 1st Canary Islands Biennale of Art, Architecture and Landscape (2006). On this occasion, Juan López broke up the phrase, and the first word, *come*, could be seen on the baggage belt in Tenerife Airport; the second word, *see*, on a plane belonging to the company that flies between the Canary Islands and, finally, the last word, *me*, was again on the baggage belt in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria Airport. By scattering the phrase, Juan López achieved a much wider geographical scope for his project and, perhaps not without a certain humor, questioned the difficult visibility that these types of events usually suffer as a result of the geographical distance, dispersal between the islands and, consequently, the limited feasibility of a project with these characteristics, given that this biennale was not repeated. Perhaps on this occasion Juan López, using humor, exercised what he himself called “a poetic resistance” to this kind of event, a resistance that is not unusual in many of his projects.
Thus far, his most monumental intervention was carried out in Valparaíso (Chile) in 2010: *The size of all the things*, a 70-meter-long hoarding with this phrase, which is so commanding and at the same time so open to all kinds of interpretation.
Applying a method of *détournement* in the way advocated by Guy Debord and Gil J. Wolman in their 1956 essay *Mode d’emploi du détournement*, in his textual interventions Juan López attempts to subvert ideological language, which is often opaque, and to turn it into an enunciative language that shows another reality. Using pre-existing elements, phrases we barely see in the urban chaos, by simple manipulation he manages to twist the meaning, giving it a new sense that, as we have already observed, oscillates between the political and the poetic. This is what happens in a recent photograph uploaded by the artist to his Facebook account: a motorway sign showing the message “CA PA AL LEM A,” which read out loud recalls in Spanish the sound of “Capa el lema,” an invitation to castrate and mutilate the slogan, that is the message, when in fact its original meaning was totally different as the words form part of the phrase “Campaña de Alcoholemia” (Alcohol Control Campaign). His method of *détournement* was very simple: without manipulating anything on the sign, hiding some letters and creating the photomontage; and thus, with a very simple distortion, a new highly uncomfortable meaning emerges. As he affirms in an interview with Bea Alonso: “The idea has always been to extract something new based on what is already established, with the dual intention of making us see that we can read things differently to how they are presented to us and to confront everyday situations with a degree of humor.”

However, not all his projects involve this linguistic component but all of them feature a reflection on and questioning of urban chaos, the city as a human construction of great complexity, which offers spaces of relations and life shared between citizens. All these components in turn make up an urban culture on which Juan López has acted since his beginnings, because, like the geographer Jordi Borja, he also sees the public space as a political space “of formation and expression of collective wills, the space of representation but also of conflict.” Based on these premises, some of his projects propose that the city enters the cultural spaces and that the language that emerges from the street coexists with the artistic codes of the art institution. And that, in short, the high and the low join together, as had already happened in the 1980s with Jenny Holzer and Barbara Kruger or, in another sense, with Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring.
These projects include *Today I aspire to nothing*, created for the Espai 13, of the Fundació Joan Miró in 2009, and for which he had the collaboration of Urban Cats Bcn, a group of practitioners of *parcours*, an urban practice that Juan López used so that its members would move around inside the exhibition space, tirelessly jumping over its architectural elements. Moreover, this project is the first by the artist in which video starts to take on a greater role, and which achieved its maximum expression in the installation *A la Derriba*, specially conceived for La Panera Art Centre, in Lleida, in 2012. The architectural space of this center exploded into eight great orifices, which allowed the life of the adjacent streets into it through previously recorded videos. The artistic container opened out to relate directly with the everyday. “The breaks work as metaphors of the idea of the ruin of an inoperative system and of a disoriented society,” the artist himself commented. But we also find a new play on words in the title of this project. In this case, the artist wanted to link the basic principle guiding the project, which was “derribar los muros” (pull down the walls) of the center, with the concept of *deriva* (adrift), which means “with no fixed direction”; this is markedly post-situationist but it can be applied equally to a ship that is adrift and to a society that is adrift, like today’s, because of the collapse of the so-far prevailing economic system. Through the breaks represented on the walls by his drawings made with black vinyl and masking tape, details gradually appear that allow us to visually recompose the activity happening in the adjacent streets: a resident looking over the balcony, a van passing by or a group of children coming in to visit the center. The proximity and division of the detail enables us to recompose the surroundings of the building housing the art center.

We find the close dialog that Juan López establishes with architecture in previous projects such as *Planetary Union*, carried out in the Museu Nacional da República, Brasilia, in 2010. Oscar Niemeyer’s white architecture cracked; cracks appeared in its walls, ramps and columns, and they shed fragments that were scattered around the building in an exercise of rare reality. It is an emblematic building, inaugurated in 2006 as the culmination of a long architectural and urban development process that placed Brasilia at the center of an intense debate, at a moment when architecture is so openly positioned in favor of political power and, thanks to Juan López’s intervention, seems to be cracking physically and metaphorically.
A similar process, but different in its aim, was used in the development of the project *The space invades* for the OK Centrum, in Linz, in 2012. In the title of the installation, Juan López is alluding to the 1978 Taito Corporation video game, whose extraterrestrials have become a familiar icon in the streets of so many cities. Once again, popular culture bursts out in the buildings of the Upper Austrian Culture Quarter, in Linz; the “space invades the architectural nave” and thus the ceilings of its school and convent burst and reveal an intense red that appears behind the vaults, while the pilasters crack. After his intervention, the arched vault not only opens visually but also conceptually, as this cultural center is beginning a period of renovation.

To conclude, we must briefly mention the installation *Rerotary*, which Juan López carried out in the Sala Naos, in Santander, in 2009. It is a surprising project because of its monumentality: 60 meters of drawings that reach a height of up to 5.5 meters. The complexity achieved in this immense wall drawing, with its rotary printing presses, working, spilling ink of all colors and throwing and expanding letters and phrases into the space, was without doubt the turning point that later allowed him to confront new and increasingly more complex tests in which architecture becomes both a challenge and an inestimable ally.

Glória Picazo
March 2013

Bea ESPEJO, “Juan López. Evolución no siempre implica progreso,” *El Cultural*, Madrid, May 8, 2012.
Jordi BORJA, “Renacimiento de las ciudades,” *Exit*, No. 17, Madrid, 2005, pp. 124-137.
Bea ESPEJO, op. cit.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ENTRE MUROS

Glória Picazo

Los muros de la ciudad, todo aquello que se halla inscrito en las paredes de calles y plazas urbanas, han ejercido una atracción muy especial en tantos y tantos creadores. Joan Miró, ya en la década de los veinte, cuando deambulaba por el casco antiguo de su ciudad natal, Barcelona, se dejaba fascinar por aquellos garabatos anónimos descubiertos al azar, como también lo haría el fotógrafo Brassaï en 1930, pero en su caso recorriendo las calles de París bajo la mirada surrealista que imperaba en aquel momento en esa ciudad. Sus fotografías son el resultado de observar y inventariar aquellos grafitis y desconchados de los muros que, desde el absoluto anonimato, mostraban una gran fuerza creativa. Transcurridos unos años, volvía sobre sus pasos para constatar las huellas que el paso del tiempo había dejado en ellos. Décadas más tarde, en los años sesenta, los nouveaux réalistes franceses, especialmente Jacques Villeglé y Raymond Hains, recorrían la ciudad de París, movidos sin duda por la influencia situacionista de Guy Debord, y se apropiaban de carteles y vallas publicitarias para realizar sus propias obras, aplicando la técnica del décollage. Se trataba de arrancar, cortar e incluso trasladar la propia valla al estudio, para construir nuevas propuestas plástico-poéticas a partir de la memoria inscrita en los muros de la ciudad.

Estos ejemplos configuran un marco de referencia para muchas de las propuestas creativas que encontraremos en décadas posteriores, cuando la ciudad y el paisaje urbano que ella configura se convierten en un escenario idóneo sobre el que el artista contemporáneo podrá intervenir. Y para hacerlo, seguirá utilizando procedimientos de «deriva» por la ciudad, parecidos a los seguidos por sus antecesores —casi podríamos llamarlos estrategias neosituacionistas—, que le permitirán descubrirla, observarla y actuar sobre ella. Tanto Emplearán métodos de intervención que seguirán pasos muy parecidos a los utilizados por los referentes citados, actuando directamente sobre los muros de la ciudad, como integrarán nuevas aportaciones, gracias a la introducción, por ejemplo, de medios como el vídeo en la creación contemporánea.

Y este es el caso de Juan López, un artista que ya desde sus inicios, cuando todavía estaba cursando sus estudios en la Facultad de Bellas Artes de Cuenca, tomó la calle y sus paredes tapizadas por capas y capas de carteles publicitarios, para actuar con el cúter sacando nuevas formas, como en Rancid (2002), una intervención en forma de alto relieve de 3 x 6 m. Sus cortes en las múltiples capas de carteles acumulados, para vaciar determinadas partes de las mismas, le permitían sacar formas singulares, como el magnífico escualo azul de Rancid, o bien construir frases en bajo relieve, para inscribir mensajes como «Ten fe» en una intervención también en la ciudad de Cuenca, Have faith (2002).
En estos primeros trabajos, Juan López ya mostraba ese interés suyo por apropiarse de la ciudad, por reflexionar sobre un paisaje urbano que a su vez es sumamente mediático, puesto que está invadido por todo tipo de mensajes publicitarios que han convertido la mayoría de las ciudades actuales en las «urbes del consumo». Pero quizás sea en estos momentos iniciales cuando también se fue definiendo su interés por el lenguaje, por los juegos lingüísticos que su uso y manipulación le permiten, con sentido crítico y político, pero también poético, y, cómo no, con unas buenas dosis de humor. Intervenciones como You will be eternal (Serás eterno) así lo confirman. Dicho proyecto fue realizado por Juan López en colaboración con Víctor García, y se llevó a cabo en Madrid en 2004. Troquelaron la lona de toldos de balcón, típicos del centro de esta ciudad, y la cosieron a la malla de protección de las obras de remodelación del edificio. La frase, por su concisión, adquiere un tono lapidario; por su monumentalidad, muestra un carácter plenamente publicitario, y por todo ello, apela a la curiosidad del transeúnte y lo impulsa a reflexionar sobre el mensaje de ánimo que conlleva.
También es el caso de la intervención Design will make you hares un nuevo bajo relieve realizado en una pared de la ciudad de Valencia en 2004. En este caso, la frase jugaba con las palabras liebre y libre, que en español se parecen tanto fonéticamente. Y también en este sentido, pero ya con una complejidad mayor de realización del proyecto, encontramos Come see me, realizado en el marco de la I Bienal de Arte, Arquitectura y Paisaje de las Islas Canarias (2006). En esta ocasión, fragmentó la frase, y la primera palabra, ven (come en inglés), podía verse en la cinta de recogida de equipajes del Aeropuerto de Tenerife; la segunda palabra, a (to), en un avión de la compañía que cubre los vuelos entre las Islas Canarias, y finalmente, la última palabra, verme (see), se hallaba de nuevo en la cinta transportadora de equipajes, en el Aeropuerto de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria. Con la dispersión de la frase, Juan López conseguía que su proyecto alcanzara un ámbito geográfico muy amplio y, quizás no sin ciertas dosis de humor, cuestionaba la difícil visibilidad que este tipo de manifestaciones suele tener, por la distancia geográfica, por la dispersión entre islas que proponía esta bienal y, como consecuencia de todo ello, la poca viabilidad de un proyecto de estas características, puesto que dicha bienal no tuvo una segunda edición. Quizás en esta ocasión, Juan López, recurriendo al humor, ejerció lo que él mismo vino en denominar «una resistencia poética» ante este tipo de convocatorias, una resistencia que, por otra parte, es algo no inusual en muchos de sus proyectos.
Hasta el momento, su intervención más monumental ha sido la llevada a cabo en Valparaíso (Chile) en 2010: The size of all the things, una gran valla de setenta metros de largo con esta frase tan imperativa y, a su vez, tan abierta a todo tipo de interpretaciones.
Aplicando un procedimiento de détournement a la manera que preconizaron Guy Debord y Gil J. Wolman en su ensayo Mode d’emploi du détournement, publicado en 1956, Juan López trata, en sus intervenciones textuales, de subvertir el lenguaje ideológico, que a menudo suele ser opaco, y convertirlo en un lenguaje enunciativo, que evidencie otra realidad. Utilizando elementos preexistentes, frases que en el caos urbano apenas percibimos, consigue con una simple manipulación que su sentido quede tergiversado, que adquiera un nuevo significado que, como hemos observado anteriormente, oscila entre lo político y lo poético. Esto es lo que sucede en una reciente fotografía colgada por el artista en su cuenta de Facebook: un panel de autopista en el que aparece el mensaje «CA PA AL LEM A». Si en un primer momento nos es difícil captar su sentido, pronto descubrimos que nos está sugiriendo que «capemos, mutilemos el lema, el mensaje». Pero el mensaje original era otro muy distinto: «Campaña de alcoholemia». Su proceso de détournement ha sido muy simple: no manipular nada del panel, ocultar algunas letras y realizar el fotomontaje; y así, con una distorsión muy sencilla, surge un nuevo significado realmente incómodo. «La idea —afirma— siempre ha sido la de sacar algo nuevo a partir de lo que ya está establecido, con la doble intención de hacer ver que se pueden leer las cosas de distinta manera a como nos las presentan y la de afrontar las situaciones cotidianas con cierto humor».

Sin embargo, no todos sus proyectos conllevan este componente lingüístico; en cambio, sí que todos ellos exhiben una reflexión y un cuestionamiento sobre el caos urbano, sobre la ciudad como construcción humana de gran complejidad, en la que se dan espacios de relación y de vida en común entre los ciudadanos. Todos estos componentes configuran a su vez una cultura urbana sobre la cual Juan López ha decidido actuar desde sus inicios, porque, coincidiendo con el geógrafo Jordi Borja, ambos consideran el espacio público también como un espacio político «de formación y expresión de voluntades colectivas, el espacio de la representación pero también del conflicto». A partir de estas premisas, algunos de sus proyectos proponen que la ciudad entre en los espacios culturales, que el lenguaje surgido en la calle conviva con los códigos artísticos propios de la institución arte. Y que, en definitiva, el high i el low se sumen, como ya había sucedido en la década de los ochenta con Jenny Holzer y Barbara Kruger, o en otro sentido, con Jean-Michel Basquiat y Keith Haring.
Entre estos proyectos está Today I aspire to nothing, realizado para el Espai 13, de la Fundació Joan Miró, en 2009 y para el cual contó con la colaboración del grupo de parkour Urban Cats Bcn, una modalidad urbana que Juan López utilizó para que sus miembros se desplazaran por el interior del espacio expositivo, saltando incansablemente sobre sus elementos arquitectónicos. Asimismo, este proyecto es el primero del artista en el que el vídeo empieza a ganar un gran protagonismo, y que alcanzará su máxima expresión en la instalación «A la Derriba», pensada especialmente para el Centre d’Art la Panera, de Lleida, en 2012. El espacio arquitectónico de este centro estallaba en ocho grandes orificios, que dejaban pasar a su interior la vida de las calles colindantes mediante grabaciones de vídeo tomadas previamente. El contenedor artístico se abría para relacionarse directamente con lo cotidiano. «Las roturas funcionan como metáforas de la idea de ruina de un sistema caduco y de una sociedad desorientada», comentaba el propio artista. Pero también en este proyecto encontramos un nuevo juego lingüístico en su título. En este caso, el artista quería unir el principio básico que guiaba el proyecto, que era «derribar los muros» del centro, con el concepto deriva, que significa «sin rumbo fijo», de marcado carácter postsituacionista, pero que igualmente puede ser aplicable tanto a una embarcación que ha perdido el rumbo y que navega a la deriva como a una sociedad a la deriva, como la actual, por el desmoronamiento del sistema económico imperante hasta ahora. A través de las roturas representadas en los muros mediante sus dibujos a base de vinilo y cinta aislante negros, van apareciendo detalles que nos permiten recomponer visualmente la actividad que transcurre en las calles adyacentes: una vecina asomada al balcón, una furgoneta pasando o un grupo de niños entrando a visitar el centro. La proximidad y la partición que nos ofrece el detalle nos permiten recomponer el todo que circunda el edificio en el que se halla el centro de arte.

El estrecho diálogo que Juan López establece con la arquitectura, lo encontramos ya en proyectos anteriores, como Planetary Union, realizado en el Museu Nacional da República, en Brasilia, en 2010. La blanca arquitectura de Oscar Niemeyer se resquebrajaba; en sus muros, rampas y columnas aparecían grietas, y de todos ellos se desprendía fragmentos de pared que se dispersaba por el edificio, en un ejercicio de inusitada realidad. Se trata de un edificio emblemático, inaugurado en 2006 como culminación de un largo proceso arquitectónico y urbanístico que ha situado Brasilia en el punto de mira de un debate intenso, en el momento que la arquitectura se sitúa tan abiertamente a favor del poder político, y que, gracias a la intervención de Juan López, parece resquebrajarse física y metafóricamente.
Un procedimiento parecido, pero distinto en su finalidad, fue utilizado en la realización del proyecto The space invades para el OK Centrum, de Linz, en 2012. En el título dado a la instalación, Juan López alude al nombre del videojuego de Taito Corporation creado en 1978, cuyos extraterrestres se han convertido en un icono habitual en las calles de tantas y tantas ciudades. De nuevo la cultura popular irrumpe en los edificios del Upper Austrian Culture Quarter, de Linz; el «espacio invade la nave arquitectónica» y, así, los techos de su escuela y de su convento estallan y dejan ver un rojo intenso que aparece tras las bóvedas, al tiempo que las pilastras se agrietan. Tras su intervención, la nave abovedada se abre no solo visualmente, sino también conceptualmente, puesto que este centro cultural está iniciando una etapa de renovación.

Para finalizar, hay que citar brevemente la instalación Rerotary, que llevó a cabo en la Sala Naos, de Santander, en 2009. Se trata de un proyecto sorprendente por su monumentalidad: 60 metros lineales de dibujo que alcanzan una altura de hasta 5,50 m. La complejidad conseguida en este inmenso wall drawing, con sus maquinas rotativas funcionando, derramando tinta de distintos colores y lanzando y expandiendo letras y frases por el espacio, fue sin duda alguna el punto de inflexión que le ha permitido con posterioridad enfrentarse a nuevos retos, cada vez más complejos, en los que la arquitectura se convierte en un desafío y, al mismo tiempo, en un aliado inestimable.

Glória Picazo
Marzo de 2013

Bea ESPEJO, «Juan López. Evolución no siempre implica progreso», en El Cultural , Madrid, 8 de mayo de 2012.
Jordi BORJA, «Renacimiento de las ciudades», en Exit, núm. 17, Madrid, 2005, pp. 124–137.
Bea ESPEJO, Op. cit.