(bajar para versión en castellano)

JUAN LÓPEZ: ARTISTIC SKATING

Armando Montesinos

1.

Baudelaire, Benjamin and Debord proposed the figure of the “flaneur” and the idea of wandering movement, and throughout the twentieth century countless pedestrians have left their trail in the artistic community, and some of them have even altered society’s path. The world does indeed change, not as fast as the manufacturers of electronic gadgets would have us believe, but without pause, and the first decade of this new century could be described, if one wished to do so, as the artistic eclosion of a kind of movement (on this occasion the word is not a metaphor) which defines the activity of the contemporary artist perfectly, namely the movement of skating.

I am not referring solely to the skate “subculture” –as some purists still call it– with its iconographic emblems, derived from psychedelia and related to metal and hip hop, that is an important part of the sentimental, physical and creative education of a generation armed with sprays, skateboards and insatiable and cloudy dreams expressed in street graffiti. Since Pop Art we know there is no high and low culture, but rather a now-globalized, single surface of variable density and grip. Skating on it is, therefore, an inescapably contemporary act. Faster than walking, it possesses the speed of moving images, and it is ecologically sustainable: it harnesses the body’s energy, at the risk of taking a fall and breaking a bone. If anyone says we talking “technogeek”, we should remind them that skating is a real discipline in which skill is gained by effort and bruises. It demands one repeat and repeat exercises and practice, exactly in the same way as academic training which so many people still pine after, until one reaches the point, in a suspended moment –spin, skid, jump, pose– when the expression attains its own style, that distinctive personal touch. And what could be more human than “losing the right way, or the effectiveness of what one is doing or saying, to make mistakes, go wrong”, which is another meaning of the word “patinar” (“to skate”) mentioned in the Royal Spanish Academy’s Dictionary?

We even say that neurons can skate off, because the brain can slip too. A Freudian slip is essentially a skating error. Words, released from nineteenth century conventions and from the corset of reason, started to make love for exalted Surrealists. But nearby, other cooler unrepentant “bachelors”, like Raymond Roussel and his follower Marcel Duchamp, certainly made them skate and slide about. And this supposedly superficial sliding of language speaks clear and deep: “Ma mere elle adore l´odeur de ma merde”, wrote the master of “With my tongue in my cheek”. Additionally, we observe the cut-up, a collage-transcending method invented for four hands by Brion Gysin and William Burroughs, which surgically dissects language and slides around the order of discourse, thus revealing the invisible venom of the discourse of order.

2.

Juan López’s skating zone is a cityscape of iconographies, architectures and alluvial mythologies, at the intersection of invisible borderlines subjected either to the laws of a hostile neighbourhood or to the excluding dictates of an elitist culture. Working in the street implies carrying out quickly performed actions, effective and transient gestures; moving in the unstable world of art requires skill and tact. No one knows for sure the meaning of what Jacques Vaché called “umor”, but it cannot be very different to what Juan López does when he sticks lapidary sentences on walls in the street, such as the slow-firing tenderness of “I DON’T KNOW WHEN OR HOW MUCH, BUT I LOVED YOU”, or the tremendous “DESIGN WILL MAKE YOU HARES”*, where Beuys’ utopia and Nazi barbarity slide together in unison, in a sage comment on Fine Art students’ forays into work.

His imagery ranges from homegrown hip hop to Spike Jonze, from tv shopping to intellectual quotes, from Ed Templeton to superheroes, from Matta-Clark to the comic duo Faemino y Cansado. His raw materials are truly simple: adhesive tape and cut-out vinyl, which work, respectively, as line and background in his large-scale drawings, which are spread over the walls of the exhibition venue, and a utility knife which slices into street advertising posters and inscribes them with an appeal to the conscience as opposed to consumerism. Special mention should be made of his use of video, either as a compositional element of his drawings or as a recording chronicling his actions, reminiscent of Allan Kaprow, who in the early 70’s said that video would not be just another elitistic style, that it would contribute things of social interest and that it would come to be used daily with the same normality that we use the telephone, anticipating by more than thirty years the current use of cell phones. A good example of this is “BUENANI!”: a huge pair of glasses the size of a room, drawn on the walls using tape and vinyl, whose lenses are untiringly swept by a video projection of windscreen wipers. Or videos like “REDIBUJO” which, projected in reverse at the speed of a silent film, documents the dismantlement of his perishable adhesive tape works: dismounting as a work of art. This is undeniably a corrosion of conventions, and it also occurs in “NO TIENES NINGUNA POSIBILIDAD” and “SEGURATA”, in which art galleries and museums’ “discourses of order” are made visible.

3.

The only art is made by artists, and no one is more aware than they of the difficulties and peculiarities of their task. As can be seen from this beautiful little fragment, the opening of a poem by J.J. Soánez, who is Juan López’s peer and collaborator.

“Despite the proud creator one needs to be to be one,
Poetry is an art born of the love of life,
Oh, special polaroid river
Tell me your motives,
And this is what makes it a great discipline,
Divine moments given over to posing,
Fine tedium:”

Fine tedium. It is hard to escape the pared-down lucidity of the expression. I think fine tedium is exactly what art has been offering for decades to those interested in it. Readers, do not be upset, this is no reason to be outraged: in opposition to the untiring supply and insatiable demand for frenzied entertainment and accelerated spectacle, tedium is an excellent vehicle for knowledge, among other things because it permits the genuine creative tradition to be maintained. Accordingly, each new generation finds ways and means to face both boredom and its refined manners, and it does so in a “cutting edge” way, to use the word the news and other similar forums would employ to describe it. Fortunately, nowadays only the mediocre and dimwitted employ iconoclasm, a most violent approach indeed. Thankfully, the artistic battles are ideological only, and the backstabbing is never more than metaphorical.

This world is certainly not a world of “divine moments”, though there are some who continue to wait, predicting miracles or the apocalypse. Nonetheless, in contrast, it is a place needy for ideas capable of reinventing it, of actions that can transform it, and this is something we know full well by now cannot be achieved by Art, that weary golden calf. But it can be achieved by artistic practices, whatever these may be. Often the word “freshness” is used condescendingly to describe young artists and their novel use of ideas, materials and technologies when a better word would be active intelligence. Juan López uses it to confront fine tedium with all the gravity of humour, and to tackle the divine moments with artistic skating techniques.

* Translator’s note: The artist is using wordplay. “Liebre” which means “hare” in Spanish sounds like “libre”, the Spanish word for “free”.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


JUAN LÓPEZ: PATINAJE ARTISTICO

Armando Montesinos

1.

Baudelaire, Benjamin y Debord propusieron la figura del “flaneur” y la idea de la deriva, y durante el siglo XX innumerables paseantes dejaron sus huellas en la comunidad artística, e incluso algunos alteraron el paso de la sociedad. Pero el mundo cambia, no tan deprisa como los fabricantes de gadgets electrónicos quieren hacernos creer, pero sin pausa, y la primera década de este nuevo siglo podría calificarse, si así se quisiera, como la de la eclosión artística de un movimiento (en este caso la palabra no es una metáfora) que define perfectamente la actividad del creador actual: patinar.

No me refiero sólo a la -algunos exquisitos todavía la llaman así- “subcultura” del skate, con sus emblemas iconográficos, herederos de la psicodelia y emparentados con el metal o el hip hop, parte importante de la educación sentimental, física y creativa de una generación armada con sprays, monopatines y sueños voraces y nebulosos plasmados en graffittis callejeros. Desde el Pop sabemos que no hay alta y baja cultura, sino una superficie única de densidad y agarre variable, hoy ya globalizada. Patinar por ella es, pues, algo inescapablemente contemporáneo. Más rápido que andar, comparte velocidad con la imagen en movimiento, y es ecológicamente sostenible: se utiliza la propia energía del cuerpo, a riesgo de dar un patinazo y quebrarse un hueso. Si alguien cree que hablamos de “moderneces”, recordemos que patinar es una verdadera disciplina donde la maestría se adquiere con magullado esfuerzo: hay que practicar y repetir y repetir ejercicios, exactamente igual que en la formación academicista que tantos aún añoran, hasta alcanzar el momento donde, en un instante suspendido –giro, derrape, salto, pose-, cobra expresión la forma propia, el distintivo toque personal. Y ¿acaso hay algo más humano que “perder la buena dirección o la eficacia de lo que se está haciendo o diciendo, errar, equivocarse”, como nos dice otra acepción del diccionario de la RAE?

Hasta las neuronas, decimos, patinan, porque también se patina con la mente. El lapsus freudiano es un patinazo en toda regla. Las palabras, liberadas de las formas decimonónicas y del corsé de la razón, hacían el amor para los exaltados surrealistas . Pero a su alrededor otros más fríos, impenitentes “solteros” como Raymond Roussel o su seguidor Marcel Duchamp, ciertamente las hacían patinar. Y ese derrape supuestamente superficial por el lenguaje habla claro y profundo: “Ma mere elle adore l´odeur de ma merde” , escribía el maestro de “With my tongue in my cheek”. O veamos el cut-up, ese método más allá del collage inventado a dos manos por Brion Gysin y William Burroughs, que disecciona el lenguaje de manera quirúrgica y hace patinar al orden del discurso, revelando así el veneno invisible del discurso del orden.

2.

El campo de patinaje de Juan López es un paisaje urbano de iconografías, arquitecturas y mitologías de aluvión, en el cruce de unas fronteras invisibles sometidas a las leyes del barrio hostil o al dictado excluyente de la cultura elitista. Trabajar en la calle implica realizar acciones de rápida ejecución, gestos eficaces y efímeros; moverse en el inestable mundo del arte precisa de destreza y mucha mano izquierda. Nadie sabe a ciencia cierta el significado de lo que Jacques Vaché denominaba “umor”, pero no debía de ser nada muy distinto a lo que Juan López practica cuando pega en un muro callejero frases lapidarias como “NO SÉ CUÁNDO NI CUÁNTO PERO OS QUERRÉ”, de retardada ternura, o la tremenda “EL DISEÑO OS HARÁ LIEBRES”, donde la utopía de Beuys y la barbarie nazi derrapan al unísono, en un sagaz comentario sobre las salidas laborales de los estudiantes de Bellas Artes.

Su imaginario va del hip hop patrio a Spike Jonze, de la teletienda a la cita culta, de Ed Templeton a los superhéroes, de Matta-Clark a Faemino y Cansado. Sus recursos materiales son bien sencillos: la cinta adhesiva y el vinilo recortado, que funcionan como línea y mancha, respectivamente, en sus grandes dibujos, que se extienden por las paredes de los espacios expositivos, y el cutter que raja el cartel publicitario callejero para inscribir una llamada a la conciencia y no al consumo. Mención aparte merece su uso del video, bien como elemento compositivo de lo dibujado o como registro de sus acciones, y que trae a la memoria a Allan Kaprow, quien en los primeros 70 dejó dicho que el video sólo aportaría cosas de interés social, y no un mero estilo elitista más, cuando se usara con la cotidiana normalidad con la que usamos el teléfono, anticipándose treinta años al uso actual de los móviles. Tomemos, por ejemplo, “BUENANI!”: unas enormes gafas del tamaño de una habitación, pues están dibujadas con cinta y vinilo en sus paredes, cuyos cristales son incansablemente barridos por unos limpiaparabrisas, proyectados en video. O los videos, como “REDIBUJO” que, proyectados marcha atrás con la velocidad propia del cine mudo, documentan el desmantelamiento de sus perecederas obras de cinta adhesiva: el desmontaje como obra de arte. Eso sí que es corrosión de las convenciones, como lo son “NO TIENES NINGUNA POSIBILIDAD” o “SEGURATA”, donde se hacen visibles los “discursos del orden” de galerías y museos.

3.

No hay más arte que el que hacen los artistas, y nadie como ellos es consciente de las dificultades y peculiaridades de su tarea. Como muestra, este hermoso botón, arranque de un poema firmado por J.J. Soánez, cómplice generacional de Juan López.

“A pesar del orgulloso creador que hay que ser para serlo,
La poesía es un arte que nace del amor a la vida,
Oh, special polaroid river
Tell me your motives,
Y eso es lo que hace de ella una gran disciplina,
Divinos momentos entregados a posarse,
Tedio fino:”

Tedio fino. Es difícil sustraerse a la desnuda lucidez de la expresión. Tedio fino, me parece, es lo que el Arte viene ofreciendo, desde hace décadas, a aquellos en él interesados. No se altere el lector, no es como para poner el grito en el cielo: frente a la demanda insaciable y la oferta incansable de entretenimiento frenético y espectacularidad acelerada, el tedio es un excelente modo de conocimiento, entre otras cosas porque permite mantener la auténtica tradición creativa, la que hace que cada nueva generación encuentre modos y recursos de enfrentarse tanto al aburrimiento como a sus refinados modales, y a hacerlo de una manera, como dicen en los telediarios y otros foros de divulgación, “rompedora”. Menos mal que en nuestros días sólo a los mediocres o descerebrados les da por la iconoclastia, práctica violenta donde las haya. Afortunadamente, las batallas artísticas son sólo ideológicas, y las puñaladas por la espalda no pasan de metafóricas.

Tampoco está el mundo, desde luego, para “divinos momentos”, aunque hay quien sigue esperando o voceando milagros o apocalipsis. Pero, en cambio, sí está necesitado de ideas capaces de reinventarlo, de acciones que lo transformen, y eso, lo sabemos bien ya, no puede hacerse desde el Arte, ese ajado becerro de oro, pero sí desde las prácticas artísticas, cualesquiera que éstas sean. A menudo, para hablar de los artistas jóvenes y de su novedoso empleo de ideas y de materiales y tecnologías, se usa condescendientemente la palabra frescura, cuando debería decirse inteligencia activa. Desde ella, Juan López se enfrenta al tedio fino con toda la seriedad del humor, y a los divinos momentos con estrategias de patinaje artístico.

(bajar para versión en castellano)

JUAN LÓPEZ: ARTISTIC SKATING

Armando Montesinos

1.

Baudelaire, Benjamin and Debord proposed the figure of the “flaneur” and the idea of wandering movement, and throughout the twentieth century countless pedestrians have left their trail in the artistic community, and some of them have even altered society’s path. The world does indeed change, not as fast as the manufacturers of electronic gadgets would have us believe, but without pause, and the first decade of this new century could be described, if one wished to do so, as the artistic eclosion of a kind of movement (on this occasion the word is not a metaphor) which defines the activity of the contemporary artist perfectly, namely the movement of skating.

I am not referring solely to the skate “subculture” –as some purists still call it– with its iconographic emblems, derived from psychedelia and related to metal and hip hop, that is an important part of the sentimental, physical and creative education of a generation armed with sprays, skateboards and insatiable and cloudy dreams expressed in street graffiti. Since Pop Art we know there is no high and low culture, but rather a now-globalized, single surface of variable density and grip. Skating on it is, therefore, an inescapably contemporary act. Faster than walking, it possesses the speed of moving images, and it is ecologically sustainable: it harnesses the body’s energy, at the risk of taking a fall and breaking a bone. If anyone says we talking “technogeek”, we should remind them that skating is a real discipline in which skill is gained by effort and bruises. It demands one repeat and repeat exercises and practice, exactly in the same way as academic training which so many people still pine after, until one reaches the point, in a suspended moment –spin, skid, jump, pose– when the expression attains its own style, that distinctive personal touch. And what could be more human than “losing the right way, or the effectiveness of what one is doing or saying, to make mistakes, go wrong”, which is another meaning of the word “patinar” (“to skate”) mentioned in the Royal Spanish Academy’s Dictionary?

We even say that neurons can skate off, because the brain can slip too. A Freudian slip is essentially a skating error. Words, released from nineteenth century conventions and from the corset of reason, started to make love for exalted Surrealists. But nearby, other cooler unrepentant “bachelors”, like Raymond Roussel and his follower Marcel Duchamp, certainly made them skate and slide about. And this supposedly superficial sliding of language speaks clear and deep: “Ma mere elle adore l´odeur de ma merde”, wrote the master of “With my tongue in my cheek”. Additionally, we observe the cut-up, a collage-transcending method invented for four hands by Brion Gysin and William Burroughs, which surgically dissects language and slides around the order of discourse, thus revealing the invisible venom of the discourse of order.

2.

Juan López’s skating zone is a cityscape of iconographies, architectures and alluvial mythologies, at the intersection of invisible borderlines subjected either to the laws of a hostile neighbourhood or to the excluding dictates of an elitist culture. Working in the street implies carrying out quickly performed actions, effective and transient gestures; moving in the unstable world of art requires skill and tact. No one knows for sure the meaning of what Jacques Vaché called “umor”, but it cannot be very different to what Juan López does when he sticks lapidary sentences on walls in the street, such as the slow-firing tenderness of “I DON’T KNOW WHEN OR HOW MUCH, BUT I LOVED YOU”, or the tremendous “DESIGN WILL MAKE YOU HARES”*, where Beuys’ utopia and Nazi barbarity slide together in unison, in a sage comment on Fine Art students’ forays into work.

His imagery ranges from homegrown hip hop to Spike Jonze, from tv shopping to intellectual quotes, from Ed Templeton to superheroes, from Matta-Clark to the comic duo Faemino y Cansado. His raw materials are truly simple: adhesive tape and cut-out vinyl, which work, respectively, as line and background in his large-scale drawings, which are spread over the walls of the exhibition venue, and a utility knife which slices into street advertising posters and inscribes them with an appeal to the conscience as opposed to consumerism. Special mention should be made of his use of video, either as a compositional element of his drawings or as a recording chronicling his actions, reminiscent of Allan Kaprow, who in the early 70’s said that video would not be just another elitistic style, that it would contribute things of social interest and that it would come to be used daily with the same normality that we use the telephone, anticipating by more than thirty years the current use of cell phones. A good example of this is “BUENANI!”: a huge pair of glasses the size of a room, drawn on the walls using tape and vinyl, whose lenses are untiringly swept by a video projection of windscreen wipers. Or videos like “REDIBUJO” which, projected in reverse at the speed of a silent film, documents the dismantlement of his perishable adhesive tape works: dismounting as a work of art. This is undeniably a corrosion of conventions, and it also occurs in “NO TIENES NINGUNA POSIBILIDAD” and “SEGURATA”, in which art galleries and museums’ “discourses of order” are made visible.

3.

The only art is made by artists, and no one is more aware than they of the difficulties and peculiarities of their task. As can be seen from this beautiful little fragment, the opening of a poem by J.J. Soánez, who is Juan López’s peer and collaborator.

“Despite the proud creator one needs to be to be one,
Poetry is an art born of the love of life,
Oh, special polaroid river
Tell me your motives,
And this is what makes it a great discipline,
Divine moments given over to posing,
Fine tedium:”

Fine tedium. It is hard to escape the pared-down lucidity of the expression. I think fine tedium is exactly what art has been offering for decades to those interested in it. Readers, do not be upset, this is no reason to be outraged: in opposition to the untiring supply and insatiable demand for frenzied entertainment and accelerated spectacle, tedium is an excellent vehicle for knowledge, among other things because it permits the genuine creative tradition to be maintained. Accordingly, each new generation finds ways and means to face both boredom and its refined manners, and it does so in a “cutting edge” way, to use the word the news and other similar forums would employ to describe it. Fortunately, nowadays only the mediocre and dimwitted employ iconoclasm, a most violent approach indeed. Thankfully, the artistic battles are ideological only, and the backstabbing is never more than metaphorical.

This world is certainly not a world of “divine moments”, though there are some who continue to wait, predicting miracles or the apocalypse. Nonetheless, in contrast, it is a place needy for ideas capable of reinventing it, of actions that can transform it, and this is something we know full well by now cannot be achieved by Art, that weary golden calf. But it can be achieved by artistic practices, whatever these may be. Often the word “freshness” is used condescendingly to describe young artists and their novel use of ideas, materials and technologies when a better word would be active intelligence. Juan López uses it to confront fine tedium with all the gravity of humour, and to tackle the divine moments with artistic skating techniques.

* Translator’s note: The artist is using wordplay. “Liebre” which means “hare” in Spanish sounds like “libre”, the Spanish word for “free”.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


JUAN LÓPEZ: PATINAJE ARTISTICO

Armando Montesinos

1.

Baudelaire, Benjamin y Debord propusieron la figura del “flaneur” y la idea de la deriva, y durante el siglo XX innumerables paseantes dejaron sus huellas en la comunidad artística, e incluso algunos alteraron el paso de la sociedad. Pero el mundo cambia, no tan deprisa como los fabricantes de gadgets electrónicos quieren hacernos creer, pero sin pausa, y la primera década de este nuevo siglo podría calificarse, si así se quisiera, como la de la eclosión artística de un movimiento (en este caso la palabra no es una metáfora) que define perfectamente la actividad del creador actual: patinar.

No me refiero sólo a la -algunos exquisitos todavía la llaman así- “subcultura” del skate, con sus emblemas iconográficos, herederos de la psicodelia y emparentados con el metal o el hip hop, parte importante de la educación sentimental, física y creativa de una generación armada con sprays, monopatines y sueños voraces y nebulosos plasmados en graffittis callejeros. Desde el Pop sabemos que no hay alta y baja cultura, sino una superficie única de densidad y agarre variable, hoy ya globalizada. Patinar por ella es, pues, algo inescapablemente contemporáneo. Más rápido que andar, comparte velocidad con la imagen en movimiento, y es ecológicamente sostenible: se utiliza la propia energía del cuerpo, a riesgo de dar un patinazo y quebrarse un hueso. Si alguien cree que hablamos de “moderneces”, recordemos que patinar es una verdadera disciplina donde la maestría se adquiere con magullado esfuerzo: hay que practicar y repetir y repetir ejercicios, exactamente igual que en la formación academicista que tantos aún añoran, hasta alcanzar el momento donde, en un instante suspendido –giro, derrape, salto, pose-, cobra expresión la forma propia, el distintivo toque personal. Y ¿acaso hay algo más humano que “perder la buena dirección o la eficacia de lo que se está haciendo o diciendo, errar, equivocarse”, como nos dice otra acepción del diccionario de la RAE?

Hasta las neuronas, decimos, patinan, porque también se patina con la mente. El lapsus freudiano es un patinazo en toda regla. Las palabras, liberadas de las formas decimonónicas y del corsé de la razón, hacían el amor para los exaltados surrealistas . Pero a su alrededor otros más fríos, impenitentes “solteros” como Raymond Roussel o su seguidor Marcel Duchamp, ciertamente las hacían patinar. Y ese derrape supuestamente superficial por el lenguaje habla claro y profundo: “Ma mere elle adore l´odeur de ma merde” , escribía el maestro de “With my tongue in my cheek”. O veamos el cut-up, ese método más allá del collage inventado a dos manos por Brion Gysin y William Burroughs, que disecciona el lenguaje de manera quirúrgica y hace patinar al orden del discurso, revelando así el veneno invisible del discurso del orden.

2.

El campo de patinaje de Juan López es un paisaje urbano de iconografías, arquitecturas y mitologías de aluvión, en el cruce de unas fronteras invisibles sometidas a las leyes del barrio hostil o al dictado excluyente de la cultura elitista. Trabajar en la calle implica realizar acciones de rápida ejecución, gestos eficaces y efímeros; moverse en el inestable mundo del arte precisa de destreza y mucha mano izquierda. Nadie sabe a ciencia cierta el significado de lo que Jacques Vaché denominaba “umor”, pero no debía de ser nada muy distinto a lo que Juan López practica cuando pega en un muro callejero frases lapidarias como “NO SÉ CUÁNDO NI CUÁNTO PERO OS QUERRÉ”, de retardada ternura, o la tremenda “EL DISEÑO OS HARÁ LIEBRES”, donde la utopía de Beuys y la barbarie nazi derrapan al unísono, en un sagaz comentario sobre las salidas laborales de los estudiantes de Bellas Artes.

Su imaginario va del hip hop patrio a Spike Jonze, de la teletienda a la cita culta, de Ed Templeton a los superhéroes, de Matta-Clark a Faemino y Cansado. Sus recursos materiales son bien sencillos: la cinta adhesiva y el vinilo recortado, que funcionan como línea y mancha, respectivamente, en sus grandes dibujos, que se extienden por las paredes de los espacios expositivos, y el cutter que raja el cartel publicitario callejero para inscribir una llamada a la conciencia y no al consumo. Mención aparte merece su uso del video, bien como elemento compositivo de lo dibujado o como registro de sus acciones, y que trae a la memoria a Allan Kaprow, quien en los primeros 70 dejó dicho que el video sólo aportaría cosas de interés social, y no un mero estilo elitista más, cuando se usara con la cotidiana normalidad con la que usamos el teléfono, anticipándose treinta años al uso actual de los móviles. Tomemos, por ejemplo, “BUENANI!”: unas enormes gafas del tamaño de una habitación, pues están dibujadas con cinta y vinilo en sus paredes, cuyos cristales son incansablemente barridos por unos limpiaparabrisas, proyectados en video. O los videos, como “REDIBUJO” que, proyectados marcha atrás con la velocidad propia del cine mudo, documentan el desmantelamiento de sus perecederas obras de cinta adhesiva: el desmontaje como obra de arte. Eso sí que es corrosión de las convenciones, como lo son “NO TIENES NINGUNA POSIBILIDAD” o “SEGURATA”, donde se hacen visibles los “discursos del orden” de galerías y museos.

3.

No hay más arte que el que hacen los artistas, y nadie como ellos es consciente de las dificultades y peculiaridades de su tarea. Como muestra, este hermoso botón, arranque de un poema firmado por J.J. Soánez, cómplice generacional de Juan López.

“A pesar del orgulloso creador que hay que ser para serlo,
La poesía es un arte que nace del amor a la vida,
Oh, special polaroid river
Tell me your motives,
Y eso es lo que hace de ella una gran disciplina,
Divinos momentos entregados a posarse,
Tedio fino:”

Tedio fino. Es difícil sustraerse a la desnuda lucidez de la expresión. Tedio fino, me parece, es lo que el Arte viene ofreciendo, desde hace décadas, a aquellos en él interesados. No se altere el lector, no es como para poner el grito en el cielo: frente a la demanda insaciable y la oferta incansable de entretenimiento frenético y espectacularidad acelerada, el tedio es un excelente modo de conocimiento, entre otras cosas porque permite mantener la auténtica tradición creativa, la que hace que cada nueva generación encuentre modos y recursos de enfrentarse tanto al aburrimiento como a sus refinados modales, y a hacerlo de una manera, como dicen en los telediarios y otros foros de divulgación, “rompedora”. Menos mal que en nuestros días sólo a los mediocres o descerebrados les da por la iconoclastia, práctica violenta donde las haya. Afortunadamente, las batallas artísticas son sólo ideológicas, y las puñaladas por la espalda no pasan de metafóricas.

Tampoco está el mundo, desde luego, para “divinos momentos”, aunque hay quien sigue esperando o voceando milagros o apocalipsis. Pero, en cambio, sí está necesitado de ideas capaces de reinventarlo, de acciones que lo transformen, y eso, lo sabemos bien ya, no puede hacerse desde el Arte, ese ajado becerro de oro, pero sí desde las prácticas artísticas, cualesquiera que éstas sean. A menudo, para hablar de los artistas jóvenes y de su novedoso empleo de ideas y de materiales y tecnologías, se usa condescendientemente la palabra frescura, cuando debería decirse inteligencia activa. Desde ella, Juan López se enfrenta al tedio fino con toda la seriedad del humor, y a los divinos momentos con estrategias de patinaje artístico.